Celebrating Singlehood and Reclaiming the Word ‘Spinster’

It’s been a while since I’ve written and I need to come on here.. but the universe is definitely speaking to me. Because THIS has been what’s on my mind.

I visited an astrologist a few years back after recently having my heart broken. And she told me that it was written for me to accomplish much greatness in my life, that men would always continue to fall at my feet, but I would never find true romance in this lifetime. She said that men took my chi and that I would not be as successful in my talent of music if I chose the path to try to fall in love. I was very sad in hearing this, but in the last few years I have realized that she is right. And the universe almost blocks me from ever working out with a man. Of course, I write my story each day… However, I have now made the conscious choice of having intimate relations when I so choose, but do not look in “settling” down. Ever. I want to live my life easy and free, not grow old with anyone but myself and my son.. And that’s the decision I have made.

I will buy this book TODAY. And love how there are other women out there who choose to live the same.

Longreads

Jessica Gross | Longreads | April 2015 | 19 minutes (4,797 words)

In 2011, Kate Bolick charted the sea change in our cultural attitudes toward marriage in her Atlantic piece, “All the Single Ladies.” Interweaving personal experience—she was 39 and single at the time—with reporting, Bolick posited that we are marrying later or not at all, with many women exercising their ability to have children without partners or, again, not at all.

The piece generated a huge response. In Bolick’s new book, Spinster: Making a Life of One’s Own, she approaches single adulthood from a slightly different angle. The book is part memoir: Bolick describes breaking away from a serious, cohabitating relationship in her late twenties, exploring her ambivalence about partnership, and wholly reconsidering her view of marriage. Along the way, she presents the stories of her five “awakeners,” the historical single women who shaped her…

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